Using RMIR to add extra functions

This page is about ideas, I expect that you have read and understood the instructions that came in the Extender 1.04 zip file, and the stuff about using RMIR and Remote Master, and I can take no responsibility if, as a result of attempting any of what follows, the sky falls on your head, or you brick your remote!

Setting up a Long Keypress

Still dealing with the same URC-6440 remote, you can use the Learning function to discover the “value” of keys that were on your original remote, but not on your OneForAll remote. Here, I have temporarily recorded the value of my DVD’s “eject” button:

Learned Signal

Learned Signal

Don’t worry that I’ve copied it to the TV record key, that’s just temporary and soon deleted. What matters here are the columns from Protocol onwards (occasionally Frequency is also needed). In this case, I discovered that the Original Button Code for Eject on my Samsung DVD remote is 1, and its Hex Command is “80”. There is a third number, not shown here, called an EFC (Extended Function Code). If you know any of these, you can use them to do other things. Using the same method, I also discovered that the Hex Code for “Stop” is “C8”.

Now, using the KeyMoves tab, I created a couple of key moves (what else?). These were to duplicate “Stop” on shift-stop, and “Eject” on xshift-stop (you’ll know what they are if you have read the manual downloaded with the extender).

Adding a Key Move

Adding a Key Move

This is where I’ve added the Eject Code to XShift-Stop key. Don’t worry about that big table in the middle, you don’t fill that in, you just double-click on the line if a new code is from an existing device. As you can see, I’ve entered the Hex value 80.

Keys moved

The procedure was repeated to add the Stop Code to Shift-Stop (above). The next thing to do was to open the Special Functions tab, and add a new function:

Long Key Press

Long Key Press

So what I did here, was to make a short press of the Stop key on the DVD player, send the Stop signal, but a long press send the Eject signal. How useful is that?

Phantom Keys

When hacking into these remotes, you’ll be surprised what the programmers can find. In the case of this remote, they found 15 more keys in circuit, which didn’t have physical keys on the remote. With Shifted and XShifted keys, that’s 45 per device! Whilst it’s true that you can’t press them, you can use them in macros. So, in the above example, if you needed the keys (Shift-Stop and XShift-Stop) for something else, you could have put the key moves onto Phantom keys, and then used those keys instead in the LongKeyPress LKP dialogue. In fact, that’s what I did for my Audio input selection, in order to get 8 input choices onto the 4 colour keys:

Audio Inputs

Audio Inputs

As you can see, I used “ToadTog” instead of Long Key Press, to select between DAB and FM radio. You might want to read about ToadTog on page 26 (section 12.6) of the manual.

Device Selection

Another idea I had, was a slicker way of selecting devices if you have more than four. Obviously you would put your main devices on the unshifted device keys, TV, PVR, DVD and Extra. But your second-string devices should go, not on the Shifted device keys, but on the XShifted device keys, TV3, PVR3, DVD3 and Extra3. You can then set up these as Long Key Presses. Then if you have further devices on TV2, etc, it only takes one press of the List (Shift) key to get to them. Note that, when selecting a device within a Macro, you should insert a Hold command ahead of the device key name. That will ensure that only the device is selected, and any Macro or extra function placed on the key is not run. In this example, if you failed to insert Hold, then a short press on the function key would put the device in an infinite loop.

Long Key Press for device selection

Long Key Press for device selection

And all four Device keys listed…

All Four Device Keys listed

All Four Device Keys listed

If you had used, say, DVD2 for this, then if you ever need to allocate DVD3, you’d have to access it pressing Shift (List) twice before DVD. That’s why this way around is slicker!

Up to you, now!

I hope that, having read my three pages, and, more importantly, the stu0ff I directed you to, that you’re now going to be able to take control of your OneForAll remote, and especially if you get the relatively cheap URC-6440, and upgrade it with the Extender and RM/RMIR, that you can take control of your remote controlled entertainment systems.

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